The strength of god by sherwood

Of course, all irony is based on contrast, whether it be between what is said and what is meant, what seems to be true and what is really true, or what one expects to happen and what is meant, and so on. The most obvious ironic contrast in "The Strength of God" is between appearance and reality.

The strength of god by sherwood

He was forty years old, and by his nature very silent and reticent. To preach, standing in the pulpit before the people, was always a hardship for him and from Wednesday morning until Saturday evening he thought of nothing but the two sermons that must be preached on Sunday.

Early on Sunday morning he went into a little room called a study in the bell tower of the church and prayed. In his prayers there was one note that always predominated.

The strength of god by sherwood

The Reverend Hartman was a tall man with a brown beard. His wife, a stout, nervous woman, was the daughter of a manufacturer of underwear at Cleveland, Ohio.

The Strength of God""

The minister himself was ather a favorite in the town. The elders of the church liked him because he was quiet and unpretentious and Mrs. White, the banker's wife, thought him scholarly and refined.

The Presbyterian Church held itself somewhat aloof from the other churches of Winesburg. It was larger and more imposing and its minister was better paid. He even had a carriage of his own and on summer evenings sometimes drove about town with his wife.

Through Main Street and up and down Buckeye Street he went, bowing gravely to the people, while his wife, afire with secret pride, looked at him out of the corners The strength of god by sherwood her eyes and worried lest the horse become frightened and run away.

For a good many years after he came to Winesburg things went well with Curtis Hartman. He was not one to arouse keen enthusiasm among the worshippers in his church but on the other hand he made no enemies.

In reality he was much in earnest and sometimes suffered prolonged periods of remorse because he could not go crying the word of God in the highways and byways of the town. He wondered if the flame of the spirit really burned in him and dreamed of a day when a strong sweet new current of power would come like a great wind into his voice and his soul and the people would tremble before the spirit of God made manifest in him.

The room in the bell tower of the church, where on Sunday mornings the minister prayed for an increase in him of the power of God, had but one window. It was long and narrow and swung outward on a hinge like a door. On the window, made of little leaded panes, was a design showing the Christ laying his hand upon the head of a child.

One Sunday morning in the summer as he sat by his desk in the room with a large Bible opened before him, and the sheets of his sermon scattered about, the minister was shocked to see, in the upper room of the house next door, a woman lying in her bed and smoking a cigarette while she read a book. Curtis Hartman went on tiptoe to the window and closed it softly.

He was horror stricken at the thought of a woman smoking and trembled also to think that his eyes, just raised from the pages of the book of God, had looked upon the bare shoulders and white throat of a woman.

With his brain in a whirl he went down into the pulpit and preached a long sermon without once thinking of his gestures or his voice. The sermon attracted unusual attention because of its power and clearness.

The strength of god by sherwood

The house next door to the Presbyterian Church, through the windows of which the minister had seen the sight that had so upset him, was occupied by two women.

Aunt Elizabeth Swift, a grey competent- looking widow with money in the Winesburg National Bank, lived there with her daughter Kate Swift, a school teacher. The school teacher was thirty years old and had a neat trim-looking figure. She had few friends and bore a reputation of having a sharp tongue.

When he began to think about her, Curtis Hartman remembered that she had been to Europe and had lived for two years in New York City. He began to remember that when he was a student in college and occasionally read novels, good although somewhat worldly women, had smoked through the pages of a book that had once fallen into his hands.

With a rush of new determination he worked on his sermons all through the week and forgot, in his zeal to reach the ears and the soul of this new listener, both his embarrassment in the pulpit and the necessity of prayer in the study on Sunday mornings. Reverend Hartman's experience with women had been somewhat limited.

He was the son of a wagon maker from Muncie, Indiana, and had worked his way through college. The daughter of the underwear manufacturer had boarded in a house where he lived during his school days and he had married her after a formal and prolonged courtship, carried on for the most part by the girl herself.

On his marriage day the underwear manufacturer had given his daughter five thousand dollars and he promised to leave her at least twice that amount in his will. The minister had thought himself fortunate in marriage and had never permitted himself to think of other women. He did not want to think of other women.

What he wanted was to do the work of God quietly and earnestly.‘The Strength of God’ by Sherwood Anderson Essay Sample. Curtis Hartman, a reverend at the Presbyterian Church in the town of Winesburg, is a deeply religious man, whom acquaintances have a lot of respect for.

Year Published: Language: English Country of Origin: United States of America Source: Anderson, S. () Winesburg, Ohio. New York, NY: B.W. Huebsch. The Strength of God T HE R EVEREND Curtis Hartman was pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Winesburg, and had been in that position ten years.

He was . Curtis Hartman, a reverend at the Presbyterian Church in the town of Winesburg, is a deeply religious man, whom acquaintances have a lot of respect for.

Though an experienced minister of ten years, Hartman still finds himself nervous and uncomfortable 3/5(3). In “The Strength of God,” one of Sherwood Anderson’s most striking stories, Curtis Hartman, a local pastor in the small town of Winesburg, Ohio, finds himself at a split: while preparing his weekly service, as he always does, in his small study on top of his chruch’s bell tower, he notices a young woman from her bedroom window, reading.

A summary of "Tandy," "The Strength of God," "The Teacher" in Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Winesburg, Ohio and what it means.

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Winesburg, Ohio - The Strength of God