Faithful elephants book review

Oaks, Quorum of the 12 Apostles. Critics' Arguments Latter-day Saints are repeatedly encouraged to rely on a witness of the spirit i. Holy Ghost to personally authenticate the truthfulness of the origins and content of the Book of Mormon. Given constant encouragement from general and local leaders of reliance on supernatural manifestations a testimony over testable claims, it is not surprising that many faithful Latter-Day Saints seem unfazed by empirical evidence or the lack of it contradicting Book of Mormon claims, whether the research is conducted by Mormon or non-Mormon archaeologists and historians.

In an attempt to explain away this thorny fact, FairMormon suggests that God Himself may have revealed the errors to Joseph.

This bizarre explanation, which would surely be unpalatable to the average Chapel Mormon, is contradicted by common sense as well as by the notion that the Book of Mormon is the most correct book on earth.

FairMormon attempts to rationalize this fact by claiming that not all Native American Indians descended from Lehi. And FairMormon cannot simply argue that Joseph Smith misunderstood the connection. Joseph Smith claimed to have been taught about the origins of Native Americans by the angel Moroni — an ancient American inhabitant himself.

FairMormon likewise confirms or otherwise ignores key anachronisms in the Book of Mormon, such as the existence of steel, wheat, horses, and many more items.

Given the current state of archaeological understanding, experts would absolutely expect to find these items, had they actually existed.

Faithful elephants book review

Indeed, no respectable non-Mormon institution including the National Geographic and Smithsonian institutions or scholar that has considered the historicity of the Book of Mormon deems it a historical record. Although FairMormon contends that certain items previously thought to have been anachronisms have since been found, FairMormon has not provided credible evidence and sources to support its extraordinary and amazing claims.

FairMormon tries to obfuscate the issue by noting that some place names were also included in the Bible and that other place names were not included in the Book of Mormon at all.

The point is that there are a striking number of names in the Book of Mormon, that appear to match the names of places surrounding Palmyra during the time at which the Book of Mormon was produced. Finally, FairMormon fails to refute the claim that the original version of the Book of Mormon and even the current version, to a lesser extent teaches the doctrine of Trinitarianism.

FairMormon implicitly concedes that Joseph Smith and the early saints were Trinitarian. There is no contemporary evidence refuting this point, and there is ample evidence confirming it. If one assumes that FairMormon's undisputed silence is acceptance of the facts, FairMormon agrees with Breakdown can be found here.

Matthew Roper in a FairMormon Blog on June 17,writes about a criticism repeated many times over the years about the mention of steel in the Book of Mormon. Who but as ignorant a person as Rigdon would have perpetuated all these blunders.

Jeremy's Response Elder Christofferson creates the following strawman: The problem lies in the fact that no ancient American steel tools or weapons or traces or evidence of them or their manufacture have ever been found.

Elder Christofferson is using a strawman by sidestepping the actual argument that no steel has ever been found in ancient America and refuting a weaker argument that steel was not capable of being manufactured at the time of Lehi. The Book of Mormon describes vast battles, with military forces dwarfing those of the Roman Empire the Roman military maxed out aroundsoldiers involving the heavy use of metallurgy.

Contrary to the accounts in the Book of Mormon, not a single steel sword, helmet, armor, chariot, spear, etc. There is zero evidence for the argument Elder Christofferson failed to address.

Misc thoughts, memories, proto-essays, musings, etc. And on that dread day, the Ineffable One will summon the artificers and makers of graven images, and He will command them to give life to their creations, and failing, they and their creations will be dedicated to the flames. Elephants have been depicted in mythology, symbolism and popular culture. They are both revered in religion and respected for their prowess in rutadeltambor.com also have negative connotations such as being a symbol for an unnecessary burden. Faithful Elephants: the Story of Animals, People and War Tsuchiya c, Submitter: This is the story of a zoo in Japan during a rutadeltambor.com officials worry that if the city is bombed, the zoo animals may escape and cause more damage.

No steel has ever been found in ancient America. That steel was manufactured in the seventh century BC in the Middle East has no bearing on whether steel was manufactured or used on a massive scale in ancient America, as depicted in the Book of Mormon.

The notion that the absence of evidence is evidence of absence is not just a rule of thumb — it is a law of Probability Theory. You know that there are no steel artifacts in that area.

Here is an analogy to further illustrate this point: And here's an even more obvious analogy:Nov 20,  · (READ: Lev Grossman’s review of the Hunger Games book). Francis Lawrence, who replaced Gary Ross to direct the last three Hunger Games films, previously made the vigorous Constantine (Keanu Reeves vs.

the antichrist), Will Smith’s post-Apocalypse vampire movie I Am Legend and the soppy period drama Water for rutadeltambor.com advantage of the bigger budget ($ .

Faithful elephants book review

Faithful Elephants: the Story of Animals, People and War Tsuchiya c, Submitter: This is the story of a zoo in Japan during a rutadeltambor.com officials worry that if the city is bombed, the zoo animals may escape and cause more damage.

In responding to the CES Letter’s Book of Mormon section, FairMormon makes a few critical concessions, including that errors unique to the version of the King James Version Bible are included in the current version of the Book of Mormon.

Faithful Elephants: A True Story of Animals, People, and War by Yukio Tsuchiya

Faithful Elephants (かわいそうなぞう, Kawaisō na Zō, lit."Pitiful Elephants"), a story written by Yukio Tsuchiya and originally published in Japan in , was published and marketed as a true story of the elephants in Tokyo's Ueno Zoo during World War II. According to the picture book, the Japanese Army had requested that every zoo in .

Book of Mormon Problems. LDS Church members are taught that the Book of Mormon (BOM) is scripture, as well as a true record of the inhabitants of the Americas from about BC to AD.

Elephants have been depicted in mythology, symbolism and popular culture. They are both revered in religion and respected for their prowess in rutadeltambor.com also have negative connotations such as being a symbol for an unnecessary burden.

Faithful Elephants. (Book, ) [rutadeltambor.com]